February 26-27. Soweto.

Soweto was just a word associated with danger and death. I’ve heard many warnings not to enter there and I expect the corresponding danger. Soweto! But it’s not dangerous at-all. We take a bus to Nelson Mandela’s place, a boring concrete museum, and ask for some NGO operating in the area. They send us to the Ikageng Centre a couple of blocks away. By the way we are with Rodrigo from Argentina who is interested in our way of traveling.

The Ikageng Centre serves a large community in the Soweto area (South West Township). It is located in a part of the township that has been substantially reconstructed and has paved roads. They explain us the biggest problems the people here are coping with on an everyday basis. Lack of education, AIDS, teenage pregnancies. And they introduce to us the programmes they run to tackle these issues. We decide to support Ikageng and hope to incorporate it in our future initiative to send spontaneous volunteers, individual low-key travelers who just want to help out. There is more they can do than we realize.

The next day we visit the place again but there is not much going on. Judging by all the facilities and programmes they are offering, they do have accumulated a great amount expertise. We hope that one day, other start-up NGO’s can benefit from sharing this expertise.

Have we made our point? This was Charity Travel Africa for now. We’ve seen some countries, we’ve missed some other countries, we definitely want to come back to this continent, we want to do more to encourage YOU to go there and help setting up any sustainable activity, help individuals strenghtening their African spirit while their corrupt leaders keep sucking in Western loans and wrong dependencies that drain creativity and a pride identity that is ready to venture beyond post-colonialism.

February 26-27. Soweto.

Soweto was just a word associated with danger and death. I’ve heard many warnings not to enter there and I expect the corresponding danger. Soweto! But it’s not dangerous at-all. We take a bus to Nelson Mandela’s place, a boring concrete museum, and ask for some NGO operating in the area. They send us to the Ikageng Centre a couple of blocks away. By the way we are with Rodrigo from Argentina who is interested in our way of traveling.

The Ikageng Centre serves a large community in the Soweto area (South West Township). It is located in a part of the township that has been substantially reconstructed and has paved roads. They explain us the biggest problems the people here are coping with on an everyday basis. Lack of education, AIDS, teenage pregnancies. And they introduce to us the programmes they run to tackle these issues. We decide to support Ikageng and hope to incorporate it in our future initiative to send spontaneous volunteers, individual low-key travelers who just want to help out. There is more they can do than we realize.

The next day we visit the place again but there is not much going on. Judging by all the facilities and programmes they are offering, they do have accumulated a great amount expertise. We hope that one day, other start-up NGO’s can benefit from sharing this expertise.

Have we made our point? This was Charity Travel Africa for now. We’ve seen some countries, we’ve missed some other countries, we definitely want to come back to this continent, we want to do more to encourage YOU to go there and help setting up any sustainable activity, help individuals strenghtening their African spirit while their corrupt leaders keep sucking in Western loans and wrong dependencies that drain creativity and a pride identity that is ready to venture beyond post-colonialism.

Ikageng

Ikageng Centre Johannesburg

Jo-burg, South Africa. February 26th, 2010

“Ikageng aims to improve the quality of life for orphaned and other vulnerable children affected by HIV/AIDS on a sustainable basis, and to ensure that they achive and live a fair life like every other child [and] to help develop [them] into educated, employable adults who could be contributors to the society.”

We visit the center twice and support this cause with a donation.

Name Ikageng AIDS Ministry, Johannesburg, South Africa
Aim “Ikageng aims to improve the quality of life for orphaned and other vulnerable children affected by HIV/AIDS on a sustainable basis, and to ensure that they achive and live a fair life like every other child [and] to help develop [them] into educated, employable adults who could be contributors to the society.”
Since 2002
Staff Carol Dyantyi, Founding Director
Tshepo Moraka, Chief Operating Officer
Nkosazana Dlamini, Psychosocial Support
People reached Ikageng services over 2000 orphans and vulnerable children around Soweto
Contact 8299 Mahalefele/Sisulu Rd, Orlando West Peoples Centre, Soweto
http://www.ikageng.org.za/
info@ikageng.org.za

Donation 200 USD

Our two visits to Ikageng have been joyful and convinced us of the good work the Centre is doing. How do we know about Ikageng? Well, we just took a bus into Soweto and got off near Nelson Mandela’s house, that is currently a rather dull museum. We asked around at a restaurant and they told us to walk down the road to the Centre. And so we did.

We are very welcome at the Centre and they show us around. On the premises there are a few sea containers transformed into offices and a storage room for foodstuff. A group of American students comes here each year to do the landscaping and it really looks good.

Ikageng renders a variety of services to the very poor and destitute in Soweto, including vocational (computer) training, an emergency feeding program, medical assistance, and self-help groups. They have been quite successful and have a wide range of international supporters.

They have an open volunteer policy and do welcome spontaneous assistance by people en route, making them an ideal cause for charity travel.

Ikageng was originally published on Meandering home