August 11. Sunny Helsinki. Bookstore.

Helsinki is sunny. That’s what it is. I spend a beautiful day walking around the city. My friendly host Hanna has given me a map and indicated some interesting places. This is my second time in Helsinki. I don’t feel like a tourist but I see the city museum. Only a few centuries ago, Helsinki was a fisher’s village with a population of 500. Under Russian rule Helsinki became the new capital. It is closer to Russian territory than Turku. I see objects on display but I can’t concentrate. Whenever confronted with too much and too well presented information, my inferiority complex strikes. Oh man, that’s bad. You have to go to a process, and ta-dah, you will learn to be happy digesting information that is entirely new to you. But that’s not your problem. I like the city and I am amazed by the amount of luxury stores here. The Finns seem to have an extremely good life. Hanna tells me that even the right-wing party supports free education and free healthcare. It is a paradise from the outset, but of course not everybody is happy. I won’t get into that now.
Bad. There is a nice bookstore with a friendly French-British owner who shows me some Dutch books he cherishes as part of his collection. I read and again the inferiority complex strikes. This time, I smile about it. I am not a genius because I don’t write with my dick. Pardon. There is a little concert which is very nice. Piano, clarinet, singer, cello. Happiness fills the room. I have to leave early to do something stupid. But almost through with that. Last dependencies rapidly dissolved, cutting the umbilical cord with not too rusty clippers.
I see people looking so forty, and I want to so something, paint a daisy on my nose when I turn forty. Then I have a beer with Ilpo and his friends, it is good.

August 11. Sunny Helsinki. Bookstore. was originally published on Meandering home

August 11. Sunny Helsinki. Bookstore.

Helsinki is sunny. That’s what it is. I spend a beautiful day walking around the city. My friendly host Hanna has given me a map and indicated some interesting places. This is my second time in Helsinki. I don’t feel like a tourist but I see the city museum. Only a few centuries ago, Helsinki was a fisher’s village with a population of 500. Under Russian rule Helsinki became the new capital. It is closer to Russian territory than Turku. I see objects on display but I can’t concentrate. Whenever confronted with too much and too well presented information, my inferiority complex strikes. Oh man, that’s bad. You have to go to a process, and ta-dah, you will learn to be happy digesting information that is entirely new to you. But that’s not your problem. I like the city and I am amazed by the amount of luxury stores here. The Finns seem to have an extremely good life. Hanna tells me that even the right-wing party supports free education and free healthcare. It is a paradise from the outset, but of course not everybody is happy. I won’t get into that now.
Bad. There is a nice bookstore with a friendly French-British owner who shows me some Dutch books he cherishes as part of his collection. I read and again the inferiority complex strikes. This time, I smile about it. I am not a genius because I don’t write with my dick. Pardon. There is a little concert which is very nice. Piano, clarinet, singer, cello. Happiness fills the room. I have to leave early to do something stupid. But almost through with that. Last dependencies rapidly dissolved, cutting the umbilical cord with not too rusty clippers.
I see people looking so forty, and I want to so something, paint a daisy on my nose when I turn forty. Then I have a beer with Ilpo and his friends, it is good.

August 11. Sunny Helsinki. Bookstore.

Helsinki is sunny. That’s what it is. I spend a beautiful day walking around the city. My friendly host Hanna has given me a map and indicated some interesting places. This is my second time in Helsinki. I don’t feel like a tourist but I see the city museum. Only a few centuries ago, Helsinki was a fisher’s village with a population of 500. Under Russian rule Helsinki became the new capital. It is closer to Russian territory than Turku. I see objects on display but I can’t concentrate. Whenever confronted with too much and too well presented information, my inferiority complex strikes. Oh man, that’s bad. You have to go to a process, and ta-dah, you will learn to be happy digesting information that is entirely new to you. But that’s not your problem. I like the city and I am amazed by the amount of luxury stores here. The Finns seem to have an extremely good life. Hanna tells me that even the right-wing party supports free education and free healthcare. It is a paradise from the outset, but of course not everybody is happy. I won’t get into that now.
Bad. There is a nice bookstore with a friendly French-British owner who shows me some Dutch books he cherishes as part of his collection. I read and again the inferiority complex strikes. This time, I smile about it. I am not a genius because I don’t write with my dick. Pardon. There is a little concert which is very nice. Piano, clarinet, singer, cello. Happiness fills the room. I have to leave early to do something stupid. But almost through with that. Last dependencies rapidly dissolved, cutting the umbilical cord with not too rusty clippers.
I see people looking so forty, and I want to so something, paint a daisy on my nose when I turn forty. Then I have a beer with Ilpo and his friends, it is good.