Gdansk/Danzig #3

Another day in Gdansk. [I did not yet reconstruct the happenings after the drinking as described in the previous post and the way I spent this day. I hope the images speak for themselves]



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Gdansk/Danzig #2

The day began with a large breakfast, the same as ever. I went out with Kathryn, and we had lunch in a famous local restaurant called Turbot, where they claim to serve all food that is mentioned in the novels of Günther Grass. That kind of rounded my experience of Gdansk. The restaurant was really great. In a quiet sellar we sat on high chairs of incredible design, and ordered the offer of the day: cucumber soup and gulash. We expected a bowl with a brown hot substance, and when the friendly smiling waiter brought us two plates that were arranged in a haute cuisine fashion, we were surprised. And it was delicious!


After lunch we walked through the old town, and enjoyed the classical townhouses with their tapered roofs. We visited the National Museum, where we found an interesting collection of Renaissance painting, as well as pottery and porcelain. My favorite painting was by a 17th century Dutchman of which I could swear, after exploring his stroke technique, that he was similar to Van Gogh. A lot of the paintings had a (from a secular perspective at least) pretty boring subject: heaven and hell. Burning drunkards and screeming sinful people on the right hand side of the panel, pious people with their hands folded together and their hands bend town before Peter on the left.

Back in the hostel, I wrote some postcards. I recall having put the Polish stamps on it, but not posting them until Vilnius, where I had to buy new stamps. Anyway, there was a young Korean girl called Kyong-Mi, who was very nice, and whom we would go and have a beer with later. In a hazy Irish Pub we had a few beers together (which we had to order in Polish). A group of American-Polish students joined us.


Gdansk/Danzig #2

The day began with a large breakfast, the same as ever. I went out with Kathryn, and we had lunch in a famous local restaurant called Turbot, where they claim to serve all food that is mentioned in the novels of Günther Grass. That kind of rounded my experience of Gdansk. The restaurant was really great. In a quiet sellar we sat on high chairs of incredible design, and ordered the offer of the day: cucumber soup and gulash. We expected a bowl with a brown hot substance, and when the friendly smiling waiter brought us two plates that were arranged in a haute cuisine fashion, we were surprised. And it was delicious!


After lunch we walked through the old town, and enjoyed the classical townhouses with their tapered roofs. We visited the National Museum, where we found an interesting collection of Renaissance painting, as well as pottery and porcelain. My favorite painting was by a 17th century Dutchman of which I could swear, after exploring his stroke technique, that he was similar to Van Gogh. A lot of the paintings had a (from a secular perspective at least) pretty boring subject: heaven and hell. Burning drunkards and screeming sinful people on the right hand side of the panel, pious people with their hands folded together and their hands bend town before Peter on the left.

Back in the hostel, I wrote some postcards. I recall having put the Polish stamps on it, but not posting them until Vilnius, where I had to buy new stamps. Anyway, there was a young Korean girl called Kyong-Mi, who was very nice, and whom we would go and have a beer with later. In a hazy Irish Pub we had a few beers together (which we had to order in Polish). A group of American-Polish students joined us.


Gdansk/Danzig #2

The day began with a large breakfast, the same as ever. I went out with Kathryn, and we had lunch in a famous local restaurant called Turbot, where they claim to serve all food that is mentioned in the novels of Günther Grass. That kind of rounded my experience of Gdansk. The restaurant was really great. In a quiet sellar we sat on high chairs of incredible design, and ordered the offer of the day: cucumber soup and gulash. We expected a bowl with a brown hot substance, and when the friendly smiling waiter brought us two plates that were arranged in a haute cuisine fashion, we were surprised. And it was delicious!


After lunch we walked through the old town, and enjoyed the classical townhouses with their tapered roofs. We visited the National Museum, where we found an interesting collection of Renaissance painting, as well as pottery and porcelain. My favorite painting was by a 17th century Dutchman of which I could swear, after exploring his stroke technique, that he was similar to Van Gogh. A lot of the paintings had a (from a secular perspective at least) pretty boring subject: heaven and hell. Burning drunkards and screeming sinful people on the right hand side of the panel, pious people with their hands folded together and their hands bend town before Peter on the left.

Back in the hostel, I wrote some postcards. I recall having put the Polish stamps on it, but not posting them until Vilnius, where I had to buy new stamps. Anyway, there was a young Korean girl called Kyong-Mi, who was very nice, and whom we would go and have a beer with later. In a hazy Irish Pub we had a few beers together (which we had to order in Polish). A group of American-Polish students joined us.


Danzig/Gdansk #1: Günther Grass

Arrived late at night, behind the train station (where KFC en MD are impossible to miss – I really don’t get how they managed to get their ugly neon logos onto this traditional building). I walked around in the old town, eventually asking some very polite Polish girls where I could find affordable accomodation. They took me away from the old town, to a house alongside the main road with a hostel in it. We woke up an American girl, who was actually an escaped cube slave, as I found out later, and a giant Hongkong man, who were both traveling alone. Silently, lit by my LED-light (O I love those little energy savers!) I sled into my bed and was away in minutes.

The next morning, I took a hot shower (showers were mixed in the hostel, so there tended to be a little gender confusion), ate breakfast, which they kindly offerd but consisted mainly of hardboiled eggs and bread with honey. Together with the coffee, it got me started though, and I walked into town to look around. What to see in Danzig: 1) something referring to Günther Grass, the native nobel prize novelist, 2) something referring to Solidarnosc, the union that made Leck Walesa famous and symbolizes the first steps of the collapse of communism. Well, for 2) the docks with the large cranes nearby and a few logos were all I needed. Instead of the Solidarnosc museum I walked to a small square where Oscar’s Bench was located. And there he sat, the little feller from The Tin Drum (Die Blechtrommel) proudly drumming with his bronze drumsticks, next to two old Polish ladies that had a conversation. I sat on another bench observing the scene, which was really cute.

I walked back and took a tram to the old town. I walked around, bought a Polish-German language guide which I planned to study in reverse, and went to the tiny street where they sell amber, the product that gave Gdansk some economical importance. Finally I settled with another cup of nerve-broth and did what I like best: writing. Time went by quickly, and I managed to pen a few pages full (I was working on a German story).

Back in the hostel I chatted a little with the aforementioned escaped cube slave, who was very kind, and a really experienced traveler. I wrote a few more lines and then I went to sleep.