April 1-3. Sweating out India.

I stay in Delhi a few more days and feel weak. It’s time to rest in the room and dream of more active times. There is really not much to say about these idle days. Yeon is visiting her friend in Hong Kong, and I just stretch on the mattress sweating out whatever harm the unfamiliar microbes may have caused.

There is a night out while I still feel weak, and I get shamelessly milked by my new friends, who order me a cocktail without even asking. It is time to say goodbye to India. I promise to cherish the brighter memories, such as that of the brilliant boy in the south, Janashekr, and the other children in EphPhatha Orphan home.

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April 1-3. Sweating out India.

I stay in Delhi a few more days and feel weak. It’s time to rest in the room and dream of more active times. There is really not much to say about these idle days. Yeon is visiting her friend in Hong Kong, and I just stretch on the mattrass sweating out whatever the unfamiliar microbes may have caused.

There is a night out while I still feel weak, and I get shamelessly milked by my new friends, who order me a cocktail without even asking. It is time to say goodbye to India. I promise to cherish the brighter memories, such as that of the brilliant boy in the south, Janashekr, and the other children in EphPhatha Orphan home.

March 31. Four hours of buses, taxis, rickshaws to get to the wrong place.

I bring Yeon to the airport, and she discovers that her camera is gone. That means: no pictures of the white tiger and no pictures of the Taj Mahal. Eventually she has become the victim of pick-pocketing, and I don’t need to warn no more. Main reason to go to the Taj Mahal: taking a photo with the Charity Travel t-shirt in front of it, so that our readers can see how good you can combine charity and travel. Ah, let me just do the charity part, I get tired of touristic consumption.
How we got to the airport? Read about that on her blog. It took us more than three hours to get to the wrong place, and then we were struck by the lightning of luck and someone brought us to the airport by car. We spend the night at the airport together, and I return to our host’s place in the morning after saying goodbye.

March 31. Four hours of buses, taxis, rickshaws to get to the wrong place.

I bring Yeon to the airport, and she discovers that her camera is gone. That means: no pictures of the white tiger and no pictures of the Taj Mahal. Eventually she has become the victim of pick-pocketing, and I don’t need to warn no more. Main reason to go to the Taj Mahal: taking a photo with the Charity Travel t-shirt in front of it, so that our readers can see how good you can combine charity and travel. Ah, let me just do the charity part, I get tired of touristic consumption.
How we got to the airport? Read about that on her blog. It took us more than three hours to get to the wrong place, and then we were struck by the lightning of luck and someone brought us to the airport by car. We spend the night at the airport together, and I return to our host’s place in the morning after saying goodbye.

March 28. All about Krishna.

Sight-seeing. The Red Fort is enormous and so is the line in front of it. Please can we not get in? Okay. We walk to the large mosque nearby and are refused in. Prayer-time. The call for prayer is too loud and scares us away. Allahou-Akbar. We go to the zoo to have a calm green walk and see creatures incapable of fanaticism. We like a termite-sucking bear and the white tiger. It is beautiful to see the white tiger taking a bath, it’s like he is leaning on his elbows and looking around leisurely.

In the evening we see a boring Indian dance show; I don’t yawn because I sleep. I do get to see some fragments though and the slowness of that Indian dance tradition could be fascinating. To the sound of traditional Indian instruments a single female dancer is making very precise looking movements with her hands and feet. It was all about Krishna.

March 27. Monosodium Glutamate English.

There must be an internet place, the kind of thing you and I are used to: wireless connection over coffee in a well-lit designed atmosphere, no strings attached, other than the astronomous beverage prices, but we star-gazers are willing to pay’em. I read about some candidate places in a glossy online magazine and the language they use makes me vomit. I WANT TO BAN MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE-ENGLISH. The smoothened and sweetened use of terms coined in glossy magazines, surviving as the stronger memes in the babble of metropolitan wannabees because they ressemble their own simple-mindedness. That sentence is admittedly not entirely free of it, so I have to be self-critical. But I AM self-critical, you see?

There is a place called Oz or something, nicely decorated with a big picture of Sydney’s skyline, that offers what we look for in a climatized space. We do our job and go home. We skip a dance-show that we thought to have dinner at a local eatery. Paneer cravings is what I will take home from this country, physiologically speaking.

March 27. Monosodium Glutamate English.

There must be an internet place, the kind of thing you and I are used to: wireless connection over coffee in a well-lit designed atmosphere, no strings attached, other than the astronomous beverage prices, but we star-gazers are willing to pay’em. I read about some candidate places in a glossy online magazine and the language they use makes me vomit. I WANT TO BAN MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE-ENGLISH. The smoothened and sweetened use of terms coined in glossy magazines, surviving as the stronger memes in the babble of metropolitan wannabees because they ressemble their own simple-mindedness. That sentence is admittedly not entirely free of it, so I have to be self-critical. But I AM self-critical, you see?

There is a place called Oz or something, nicely decorated with a big picture of Sydney’s skyline, that offers what we look for in a climatized space. We do our job and go home. We skip a dance-show that we thought to have dinner at a local eatery. Paneer cravings is what I will take home from this country, physiologically speaking.