Philipino household workers

Philipino migrant workers’ shelter, Amman

Amman, Jordan. November 17th, 2009

The living condition for Philipino migrant workers in Jordan is so bad that the embassy had to put up a shelter for them.

We support some Philipino migrant workers with their medication.

Name Embassy of the Philippines to Jordan / support and shelter for distressed household workers
Aim To help distressed and maltreated household workers with legal and medical assistance
Since 2005
Staff 10 people
People reached over 160 household workers from a total of 28,000 employed in Jordan needed to seek refuge in the embassy shelter
Contact Jeffrey P- Salik
Third Secretary and Vice Consul
Embassy of the Philippines
beirutpe@dfa.gov.ph
Donation 150 USD

The faith of millions of household workers that leave their countries every year in utter desperation to work abroad under terrible conditions deserves much more attention than it is currently granted by the mainstream media. That is why I decide to support the shelter the Philippine embassy to Jordan is running for distressed and abused Filipino housekeepers that have to flee their employers. The Indonesian and Sri Lankan embassy also have their shelters here. Now the situation of the household workers in Jordan is relatively good compared to the treatment they get in Saoudi Arabia and Quwait.

In the Philippine shelter, established 2005, live more than 160 people from about 28,000 Filipino workers employed in Jordan. Many of them work under terrible conditions, are not allowed to take even the shortest break on a 16 hour working day, are abused mentally or physically. There are exceptional cases of suicide, unwanted pregnancies, and rape. Some people have to stay in the shelter for more than a year because they are legally forced to pay back the sum their employer has invested to bring them here, typically about 2000 USD.

The shelter provides basic care and legal assistance for those who were abused, forced to leave, or not even employed because of health issues, yet can’t go back to the Philippines because of the financial claim mentioned above.

Charity Travel supported two women with their medical bills. We are hoping that the faith of the household workers will be noticed by enough people to take action on a larger scale.

Philipino household workers was originally published on Meandering home

November 12. Lagging behind.

A day of writing and administration. I stay in almost all day, except for a short visit to the supermarket where I buy the ingredients for a salad, that will be my contribution to the party at night.

And that party is really nice. There is plenty of delicious food and karaoke. I find myself ruining Hey Jude and California Girls and Chiquitita and we have so much fun. I also introduce my project and can establish some contacts for a woman who wants to build an orphanage on the Philippines. It makes me feel useful. I am happy to be here, and do enjoy my life. I don’t hold much of the primitive doctrine that goes like “give one and God will return you ten”, implying that that is the best Reason to give, but still, I am sometimes quite perplexed when I realize how good my life is today.

November 12. Lagging behind. was originally published on Meandering home

November 12. Lagging behind.

A day of writing and administration. I stay in almost all day, except for a short visit to the supermarket where I buy the ingredients for a salad, that will be my contribution to the party at night.

And that party is really nice. There is plenty of delicious food and karaoke. I find myself ruining Hey Jude and California Girls and Chiquitita and we have so much fun. I also introduce my project and can establish some contacts for a woman who wants to build an orphanage on the Philippines. It makes me feel useful. I am happy to be here, and do enjoy my life. I don’t hold much of the primitive doctrine that goes like “give one and God will return you ten”, implying that that is the best Reason to give, but still, I am sometimes quite perplexed when I realize how good my life is today.

November 11. Amman hot sun.

Let’s skip our discussion about the Israelis. It’s a very intense and sensitive issue. Breakfast is plenty and I get at least some writing done, before we go do some sightseeing with Tönis and Basil, a publicity guy working at the US embassy. The citadel of Amman is as interesting as a pile of stones can be. The many different layers of culture, Roman, Byzantine, Omayyad. The Omayyad mosque is especially worth mentioning. They’ve reconstructed the dome in wood after doing meticulous research to find out that the thing must have had a round base. We walk in the hot sun between the ruins, something that is a delight for my Estonian friend.

We have a typical monosodium glutamate meal, and back home I work on the computer again because I am still lagging behind my schedule like an old camel whose rugged leash is dragging through the sand symbolizing its languor in peculiar patterns.

November 11. Amman hot sun.

Let’s skip our discussion about the Israelis. It’s a very intense and sensitive issue. Breakfast is plenty and I get at least some writing done, before we go do some sightseeing with Tönis and Basil, a publicity guy working at the US embassy. The citadel of Amman is as interesting as a pile of stones can be. The many different layers of culture, Roman, Byzantine, Omayyad. The Omayyad mosque is especially worth mentioning. They’ve reconstructed the dome in wood after doing meticulous research to find out that the thing must have had a round base. We walk in the hot sun between the ruins, something that is a delight for my Estonian friend.

We have a typical monosodium glutamate meal, and back home I work on the computer again because I am still lagging behind my schedule like an old camel whose rugged leash is dragging through the sand symbolizing its languor in peculiar patterns.

November 11. Amman hot sun.

Let’s skip our discussion about the Israelis. It’s a very intense and sensitive issue. Breakfast is plenty and I get at least some writing done, before we go do some sightseeing with Tönis and Basil, a publicity guy working at the US embassy. The citadel of Amman is as interesting as a pile of stones can be. The many different layers of culture, Roman, Byzantine, Omayyad. The Omayyad mosque is especially worth mentioning. They’ve reconstructed the dome in wood after doing meticulous research to find out that the thing must have had a round base. We walk in the hot sun between the ruins, something that is a delight for my Estonian friend.

We have a typical monosodium glutamate meal, and back home I work on the computer again because I am still lagging behind my schedule like an old camel whose rugged leash is dragging through the sand symbolizing its languor in peculiar patterns.

November 11. Amman hot sun. was originally published on Meandering home